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Bangers

 

Why are they called Bangers? Supposedly during WW2 when rations were short people would make sausages with too much water in the mix in order to stretch the ingredients and make more sausages. They excess water content would cause the sausages to explode when cooked. So...watch your water content when making these, you don't want World War 3 to break out in your kitchen!

 

If you love sausages like me (Ooo er!) then you'll want to double this recipe. The more the merrier! One can never have enough sausage. ; )

Time: Approx 3 hrs (2hrs inactive) plus 1 day rest time in the fridge

Makes about 24

 

Ingredients

  • 900g or 2lbs pork belly

  • 900g or 2 lbs pork shoulder

  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh thyme

  • 3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh sage

  • 1 tablespoon ground coriander seeds

  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger

  • 1/2 teaspoon ground nutmeg

  • 1/2 tablespoon white pepper

  • 1 tablespoon salt

  • 120g or 1 cup fine breadcrumbs (can use gluten free)

  • 2 cloves garlic finely minced

  • 240ml or 1 cup water

  • 32mm natural hog casings

Cumberland Sausages

Don't forget the gravy and mash!

Ingredients

  • 900g or 2lbs pork belly

  • 900g or 2lbs pork shoulder

  • 2 tablespoons Fresh Sage finely chopped

  • 2 tablespoons Dried Chives

  • 1 teaspoon Ground Coriander

  • 1/2 teaspoon Nutmeg

  • 1 teaspoon Mace

  • 1 tablespoon salt

  • 1 and 1 /2 tablespoons white pepper

  • 120g or 1 cup Breadcrumbs

  • 240ml or 1 cup water

  • 32mm diameter Natural hog casing

Sausage making tips

If you are new to making your own sausages then this is the place to start.

 

When if comes to ingredients there are no hard and fast rules, everyone has different tastes so experiment and have fun with the flavours.

  • Pork shoulder or pork belly or a mixture of the two are the best cuts of meat to use for the kinds of sausages on this page. Look for a cut that has a good amount of fat running through it. It will keep your sausages from being too dry. 20 to 30% fat. Do not include the rind.

  • Cut the meat into cubes or strips that are thin enough to fit through your meat grinder.

  • It helps if the meat is partially frozen, it passes through the grinder more easily.

  • You can also chill your grinder blades and plates in the freezer while you are prepping the ingredients to help in the grinding process.

  • When using breadcrumbs be sure to include an equal amount of water into the mixture to re-hydrate the crumbs and prevent the mixture from being too dry.

  • Use natural hog casings when possible. 32mm is a good size for these sausages.

  • It's ALWAYS a good idea to make sausages in large quantities because of the time involved in making them. You can easily freeze them. They make a very quick and handy go to dinner.

Method

  1. Soak the hog casings in cold water or as the packet instructs (some require soaking overnight so check this well in advance). Rinse them thoroughly.

  2. Mix together the thyme, sage, coriander seeds, ginger, nutmeg, pepper, salt, garlic and breadcrumbs in a small mixing bowl.

  3. Mince chopped meat in a meat grinder through a 5mm mincing plate.

  4. Combine the pork with the seasoning and breadcrumb mix. Add the water, mix well and leave for 2 hours to rest. At this point you can test fry some sausage meat to check the seasoning.

  5. Remove the mincing blades from the grinder and attach the sausage funnel. Press about a cm of sausage out of the funnel before putting the casing over it. The meat will lubricate the casing from the inside making it much easier to slide on. (Oh my!) Tie one end of the hog casing in a knot and slide the other end over the funnel attachment and ease the casing down the shaft slowly (Are we still talking about sausages?) so that it is bunches up on the funnel.

  6. Put the meat back in to the grinder a bit at a time if it doesn't all fit. Set to a slow setting. Watch carefully as the meat fills the casing to ensure that it does not become too tightly packed or filled with air bubbles, supporting the casing as it fills with your hand. When your sausage reaches it's desired length give the casing a twist 2 or 3 times. 10cm or 6 inches is a good average size (it's so difficult to refrain from making school girl comments while writing this).

  7. Tie a knot after the final sausage or when the casing comes to an end.

  8. Although it's hard to resist cooking them up and snarfing them straight away, allow them to rest in the fridge overnight. It will give the flavours a chance to marinade and the breadcrumbs ample time to plump.

  9. When it comes to cooking I prefer the slow fry to produce the juiciest sausage. Put a dab of butter and a smidge of olive oil in a heavy skillet and set over a low heat. Cook for approx 40 mins turning to brown on all sides. DO NOT PRICK WITH A FORK!! You've spent a great deal of time and effort in creating these lovelies, there's no need to stab them and rob them of their gorgeous juices. They won't explode.

 
 

Lincolnshire Sausage

This is the mix for a proper Lincolnshire sausage, currently fighting for PDO (protected designation of origin) status, meaning it will have to be made in the county, from specified ingredients, to a specified standard to be called a Lincolnshire .

 

Time: Approx 3hrs (2hrs inactive) plus two days rest time in fridge

Ingredients

  • Pork shoulder, pork belly)700 g or 1.5 lb

  • Dry wheat roll or bread 150 g

  • Water 150 g

  • Salt 3 tsp

  • White pepper 2 tsp

  • Fresh sage finely chopped 4 tsp

Method

  1. Soak the hog casings in cold water or as the packet instructs (some require soaking overnight so check this well in advance). Rinse them thoroughly.

  2. Mix together the sage, chives, coriander, nutmeg, mace, salt, pepper and breadcrumbs in a small mixing bowl.

  3. Mince chopped meat in a meat grinder through a 5mm mincing plate.

  4. Combine the pork with the seasoning and breadcrumb mix. Add the water, mix well and leave for 2 hours to rest. At this point you can test fry some sausage meat to check the seasoning.

  5. Remove the mincing blades from the grinder and attach the sausage funnel. Press about a cm of sausage out of the funnel before putting the casing over it. The meat will lubricate the casing from the inside making it much easier to slide on. (Oh my!) Tie one end of the hog casing in a knot and slide the other end over the funnel attachment and ease the casing down the shaft slowly (Are we still talking about sausages?) so that it is bunches up on the funnel.

  6. Put the meat back in to the grinder a bit at a time if it doesn't all fit. Set to a slow setting. Watch carefully as the meat fills the casing to ensure that it does not become too tightly packed or filled with air bubbles, supporting the casing as it fills with your hand. Cumberland sausages are famous for their coils. A good length to aim for is 40 to 50cm (15 to 20inches). You can coil into a spiral as you stuff or sort it out after you're done. Be sure to tie a knot in the end of the coil.

  7. Although it's hard to resist cooking them up and snarfing them straight away, allow them to rest in the fridge overnight. It will give the flavours a chance to marinade and the breadcrumbs ample time to plump.

  8. When ready to cook, preheat the oven to 180C/gas 4/350F. Bake for 35 minutes, basting frequently. DO NOT PRICK WITH A FORK!! You've spent a great deal of time and effort in creating these lovelies, there's no need to stab them and rob them of their gorgeous juices. They won't explode.

Method

  1. Soak the hog casings in cold water or as the packet instructs (some require soaking overnight so check this well in advance). Rinse them thoroughly.

  2. Mix together the sage, pepper, salt and breadcrumbs in a small mixing bowl. 

  3. Mince chopped meat in a meat grinder through a 10mm mincing plate. One of Lincolnshire sausages distinctions is their courser texture.

  4. Combine the pork with the seasoning and breadcrumb mix. Add the water, mix well and leave for 2 hours to rest. At this point you can test fry some sausage meat to check the seasoning.

  5. Remove the mincing blades from the grinder and attach the sausage funnel. Press about a cm of sausage out of the funnel before putting the casing over it. The meat will lubricate the casing from the inside making it much easier to slide on. (Oh my!) Tie one end of the hog casing in a knot and slide the other end over the funnel attachment and ease the casing down the shaft slowly (Are we still talking about sausages?) so that it is bunches up on the funnel.

  6. Put the meat back in to the grinder a bit at a time if it doesn't all fit. Set to a slow setting. Watch carefully as the meat fills the casing to ensure that it does not become too tightly packed or filled with air bubbles, supporting the casing as it fills with your hand. When your sausage reaches it's desired length give the casing a twist 2 or 3 times. 10cm or 6 inches is a good average size (it's so difficult to refrain from making school girl comments while writing this).

  7. Tie a knot after the final sausage or when the casing comes to an end.

  8. Although it's hard to resist cooking them up and snarfing them straight away, allow them to rest in the fridge for 48 hours. It will give the flavours a chance to marinade and the breadcrumbs ample time to plump.

  9. When it comes to cooking I prefer the slow fry to produce the juiciest sausage. Put a dab of butter and a smidge of olive oil in a heavy skillet and set over a low heat. Cook for approx 40 mins turning to brown on all sides. DO NOT PRICK WITH A FORK!! You've spent a great deal of time and effort in creating these lovelies, there's no need to stab them and rob them of their gorgeous juices. They won't explode.

 
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